Engineering mechanics statics 14th edition pdf

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Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, NJ. All rights reserved. This material is protected under all copyright laws as they currently exist. No portion. ENGINEERING MECHANICS statics and DYNAMICS Fourteenth EDITION .. The ISBN for each valuepack is as follows: • Engineering Mechanics: Statics with . instructor's solutions manual ch. instructor's solutions manual ch. pearson education, inc., upper saddle river, nj. all rights reserved. this.

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Engineering Mechanics Statics 14th Edition Pdf

TWELFTH EDITION. R. C. HIBBELER 11 basIc ~nowledge of both statics and dynamiCS. which form the subject matter of engineering mechanil::s. Before we begin our study of engineering mechanics. it is important to understand the. Downloads PDF Engineering Mechanics: Statics (14th Edition), PDF Downloads Engineering Mechanics: Statics (14th Edition), Downloads. Engineering Mechanics: Statics 14th Edition - PDF Version. Solution Manual for Engineering Mechanics Statics Edition by Hibbeler - Shop Solutions Manual.

Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. If you continue browsing the site, you agree to the use of cookies on this website. See our User Agreement and Privacy Policy. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. Published on Jul 2, Statics 14th Edition , Downloads Engineering Mechanics: Statics 14th Edition , Ebook Engineering Mechanics: Statics 14th Edition , Epub Engineering Mechanics:

Express force F as a Cartesian vector; then determine its z coordinate direction angles. Express each of the forces in Cartesian vector form and z determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles of the resultant force.

The 8-m-long cable is anchored to the ground at A. Express each of the forces in Cartesian vector form and z determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles 0.

The coordinates for points A, B and C are 0, - 0. FR y If N and N, determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles of the resultant force acting on the flag pole. The unit vectors u and u of F and F must be determined first. F F F i j k i j k i 40j k N The magnitude of F is 2 2 2 2 40 2 2 The coordinate direction angles of F are 1 1 cos cos If N, and N, determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles of the resultant force acting on the flag pole.

F F F i j k i j k i j k N The magnitude of F is 2 2 2 2 2 2 The plate is suspended using the three cables which exert z the forces shown. The three supporting cables exert the forces shown on the z sign. Represent each force as a Cartesian vector. Determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles z of the resultant force of the two forces acting on the sign at C 2m point A. Express the force as a Cartesian vector. The load at A creates a force of 60 lb in wire AB.

Express z this force as a Cartesian vector acting on A and directed toward B as shown. First determine the position vector rAB. Determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles of z the resultant force acting at point A on the post. And its coordinate direction angles are FR x - 2. The two mooring cables exert forces on the stern of a ship z as shown. Represent each force as a Cartesian vector and determine the magnitude and coordinate direction angles of the resultant.

The coordinate direction angles of FR are The engine of the lightweight plane is supported by struts that z are connected to the space truss that makes up the structure of the plane. The anticipated loading in two of the struts is 3 ft shown. Express each of these forces as a Cartesian vector. F2 lb 0. Determine the magnitude and coordinates on angles of the z resultant force.

If the force in each cable tied to the bin is 70 lb, determine z the magnitude and coordinate direction angles of the resultant force. From Fig.

FR Ans: Due to symmetry, the tension in the four cables is the same. Express the force F in Cartesian vector form if it acts at the z midpoint B of the rod. Express force F in Cartesian vector form if point B is z located 3 m along the rod end C. The chandelier is supported by three chains which are z concurrent at point O. If the force in each chain has a magnitude of 60 lb, express each force as a Cartesian vector and determine the magnitude and coordinate direction O angles of the resultant force.

If the resultant force at O has a magnitude of lb and is directed along the negative z axis, determine the force in each chain. The window is held open by chain AB. Determine the z length of the chain, and express the lb force acting at A along the chain as a Cartesian vector and determine its 5 ft coordinate direction angles. Coordinate Direction Angles: The window is held open by cable AB. Determine the z length of the cable and express the N force acting at A along the cable as a Cartesian vector.

The unit vectors uEB and uED must be determined first. Determine the angle u between the two cables. Determine the magnitude of the projection of the force F1 z along cable AC. The positive sign indicates that this component points in the same direction as uAC. Determine the angle u between the y axis of the pole and ] the wire AB. The dot product of two vectors must be determined first. Determine the magnitudes of the projected components of z 0. Determine the angle u between cables AB and AC.

Two cables exert forces on the pipe. Determine the z magnitude of the projected component of F1 along the line of action of F2. Determine the angle u between the two cables attached to z the pipe. Determine the angle u between the cables AB and AC. The positive sign indicates that this component points in the same direction as uBA. The positive sign indicates that this component points in the same direction as uCA. The unit vectors uOA and uu must be determined first. Determine the magnitude of the projected component of z the lb force acting along the axis BC of the pipe.

Determine the angle u between pipe segments BA and BC. Determine the angle u between BA and BC. Determine the magnitudes of the components of F acting z along and perpendicular to segment BC of the pipe assembly. The unit vector uCB must be determined first. Determine the magnitude of the projected component of F z along AC.

Express this component as a Cartesian vector. The unit vector uAC must be determined first. Determine the angle u between the pipe segments BA and BC. The position vectors rBA and rBC must be determined first. From 4 ft Fig. His work consisted of experiments using pendulums and falling bodies. The most significant contributions in dynamics, however, were made by Isaac Newton , who is noted for his formulation of the three fundamental laws of motion and the law of universal gravitational attraction.

Shortly after these laws were postulated, important techniques for their application were developed by other scientists and engineers, some of whom will be mentioned throughout the text. Basic Quantities. The following four quantities are used throughout mechanics.

Length is used to locate the position of a point in space and thereby describe the size of a physical system. Once a standard unit of length is defined, one can then use it to define distances and geometric properties of a body as multiples of this unit.

Time is conceived as a succession of events.

Hibbeler, Engineering Mechanics: Statics | Pearson

Although the principles of statics are time independent, this quantity plays an important role in the study of dynamics. Mass is a measure of a quantity of matter that is used to compare the action of one body with that of another. This property manifests itself as a gravitational attraction between two bodies and provides a measure of the resistance of matter to a change in velocity.

In general, force is considered as a push or pull exerted by one body on another. This interaction can occur when there is direct contact between the bodies, such as a person pushing on a wall, or it can occur through a distance when the bodies are physically separated.

Examples of the latter type include gravitational, electrical, and magnetic forces. In any case, a force is completely characterized by its magnitude, direction, and point of application. Models or idealizations are used in mechanics in order to simplify application of the theory.

Here we will consider three important idealizations. A particle has a mass, but a size that can be neglected. For example, the size of the earth is insignificant compared to the size of its orbit, and therefore the earth can be modeled as a particle when studying its orbital motion.

When a body is idealized as a particle, the principles of mechanics reduce to a rather simplified form since the geometry of the body will not be involved in the analysis of the problem. Rigid Body. A rigid body can be considered as a combination of a large number of particles in which all the particles remain at a fixed distance from one another, both before and after applying a load.

This model is important because the bodys shape does not change when a load is applied, and so we do not have to consider the type of material from which the body is made. In most cases the actual deformations occurring in structures, machines, mechanisms, and the like are relatively small, and the rigid-body assumption is suitable for analysis.

Concentrated Force. A concentrated force represents the effect of a loading which is assumed to act at a point on a body.

Engineering Mechanics Statics 14th Edition

We can represent a load by a concentrated force, provided the area over which the load is applied is very small compared to the overall size of the body. An example would be the contact force between a wheel and the ground.

Three forces act on the ring. Since these forces all meet at a point, then for any force analysis, we can assume the ring to be represented as a particle. Russell C. Hibbeler Steel is a common engineering material that does not deform very much under load.

Therefore, we can consider this railroad wheel to be a rigid body acted upon by the concentrated force of the rail. Engineering mechanics is formulated on the basis of Newtons three laws of motion, the validity of which is based on experimental observation. These laws apply to the motion of a particle as measured from a nonaccelerating reference frame. They may be briefly stated as follows. First Law. A particle originally at rest, or moving in a straight line with constant velocity, tends to remain in this state provided the particle is not subjected to an unbalanced force, Fig.

A particle acted upon by an unbalanced force F experiences an acceleration a that has the same direction as the force and a magnitude that is directly proportional to the force, Fig. The mutual forces of action and reaction between two particles are equal, opposite, and collinear, Fig. Equilibrium and stability of this scissors lift as a function of its position canbedetermined using the methods of work and energy, which are explained in this chapter.

It provides an alternative method for solving problems involving the equilibrium of a particle, a rigid body, or a system of connected rigid bodies. Before we discuss this principle, however, we must first define the work produced by a force and by a couple moment. Work of a Force. A force does work when it undergoes a displacement in the direction of its line of action. Consider, for example, the force F in Fig. If we use the definition of the dot product Eq.

The unit of work in the FPS system is the foot-pound ft lb , which is the work produced by a 1-lb force that displaces through a distance of 1 ft in the direction of the force. The moment of a force has this same combination of units; however, the concepts of moment and work are in no way related.

A moment is a vector quantity, whereas work is a scalar. Work of a Couple Moment.

The rotation of a couple moment also produces work. Consider the rigid body in Fig. When the body undergoes the differential displacement shown, points A and B move drA and drB to their final positions A and B, respectively. The couple forces do no work during the translation drA because each force undergoes the same amount of displacement in opposite directions, thus canceling out the work. The definitions of the work of a force and a couple have been presented in terms of actual movements expressed by differential displacements having magnitudes of dr and du.

Consider now an imaginary or virtual movement of a body in static equilibrium, which indicates a displacement or rotation that is assumed and does not actually exist. These movements are first-order differential quantities and will be denoted by the symbols dr and du delta r and delta u , respectively. If we imagine the ball to be displaced downwards a virtual amount dy, then the weight does positive virtual work, W dy, and the normal force does negative virtual work, -N dy.

When writing these equations, it is not necessary to include the work done by the internal forces acting within the body since a rigid body does not deform when subjected to an external loading, and furthermore, when the body moves through a virtual displacement, the internal forces occur in equal but opposite collinear pairs, so that the corresponding work done by each pair of forces will cancel.

To demonstrate an application, consider the simply supported beam in Fig. When the beam is given a virtual rotation du about point B, Fig.

As seen from the above two examples, no added advantage is gained by solving particle and rigid-body equilibrium problems using the principle of virtual work. This is because for each application of the virtual-work equation, the virtual displacement, common to every term, factors out, leaving an equation that could have been obtained in a more direct manner by simply applying an equation of equilibrium.

General PrinciplesChapter Objectives1. Force VectorsChapter Objectives2. Equilibrium of a ParticleChapter Objectives3. Force System ResultantsChapter Objectives4. Equilibrium of a Rigid BodyChapter Objectives5. These photos generally are used to explain how the relevant principles apply to real-world situations and how materials behave under load. New Problems. Organization and Approach.

Each chapter is organized into well-defined sections that contain an explanation of specific topics, illustrative example problems, and a set of homework problems. The topics within each section are placed into subgroups defined by boldface titles.

The purpose of this is to present a structured method for introducing each new definition or concept and to make the book convenient for later reference and review.

Chapter Contents. Each chapter begins with an illustration demonstrating a broad-range application of the material within the chapter. A bulleted list of the chapter contents is provided to give a general overview of the material that will be covered. Emphasis on Free-Body Diagrams. Drawing a free-body diagram is particularly important when solving problems, and for this reason this step is strongly emphasized throughout the book.

In particular, special sections and examples are devoted to show how to draw free-body diagrams.

Specific homework problems have also been added to develop this practice. Procedures for Analysis.

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A general procedure for analyzing any mechanical problem is presented at the end of the first chapter. Then this procedure is customized to relate to specific types of problems that are covered throughout the book. This unique feature provides the student with a logical and orderly method to follow when applying the theory. The example problems are solved using this outlined method in order to clarify its numerical application. Realize, however, that once the relevant principles have been mastered and enough confidence and judgment have been obtained, the student can then develop his or her own procedures for solving problems.

Important Points. This feature provides a review or summary of the most important concepts in a section and highlights the most significant points that should be realized when applying the theory to solve problems.

Fundamental Problems. These problem sets are selectively located just after most of the example problems.

They provide students with simple applications of the concepts, and therefore, the chance to develop their problem-solving skills before attempting to solve any of the standard problems that follow. In addition, they can be used for preparing for exams, and they can be used at a later time when preparing for the Fundamentals in Engineering Exam. Conceptual Understanding. Through the use of photographs placed throughout the book, theory is applied in a simplified way in order to illustrate some of its more important conceptual features and instill the physical meaning of many vi i i Preface of the terms used in the equations.

These simplified applications increase interest in the subject matter and better prepare the student to understand the examples and solve problems. Homework Problems.

Apart from the Fundamental and Conceptual type problems mentioned previously, other types of problems contained in the book include the following: Free-Body Diagram Problems. Some sections of the book contain introductory problems that only require drawing the free-body diagram for the specific problems within a problem set. These assignments will impress upon the student the importance of mastering this skill as a requirement for a complete solution of any equilibrium problem.

General Analysis and Design Problems. The majority of problems in the book depict realistic situations encountered in engineering practice.

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