In probing what a real-life Batman could achieve, Zehr considers the of escapism grounded in sound science, Becoming Batman provides. Compre o livro Becoming Batman: The Possibility of a Superhero na eBook Kindle Who at some point in their life hasn't dreamed of being a superhero?. Get this from a library! Becoming Batman: the possibility of a superhero. [E Paul Zehr] -- "Battling bad guys. High-tech hideouts. The gratitude of.

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Becoming Batman Ebook

Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. What are the odds that an ordinary billionaire like Kindle Store; ›; Kindle eBooks; ›; Politics & Social Sciences. Becoming Batman: the possibility of a superhero / by E. Paul Zehr. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN- 0- 5 ( hbk. Mar 25, [PDF DOWNLOAD] Becoming Batman: The Possibility of a Revolutionary Medicine (eBook) Medicine Book, Personal Library, Science Books.

Batman: How Buff Was Bruce? Paul Zehr. Abstract: A fun foray of escapism grounded in sound science, Becoming Batman provides the background for attaining the realizable-though extreme-level of human performance that would allow you to be a superhero. Read more I only wish I could have read Dr. Zehr's fascinating book then, so that I would have known exactly what it takes to become a real superhero. But Batman is only the scaffolding on which Zehr hands his detailed look at the role of genetic makeup, diet, strength training and development of motor skills in attaining the 'outer limits' of physical performance. Becoming Batman is an interesting discussion on the science of superheroes. There is really nothing more awesome than reading a book that cites obscure neuroscience journals in the same sentence with citations to obscure Batman comics. His conclusions are sometimes surprising, and often fascinating. And for those who aspire to don a cape and cowl, it's essential reading. That Dr. Zehr manages to add any style to his efforts and let's be fair, scientists aren't known for their 'suave' , is a credit to the man and a credit to his obvious enthusiasm for his work and interests. If you're not careful, you might learn something. It's a guy who is a doctor, and looking into the actual possibility of Batman and what it would take to be that person in real life: What it would do to your muscles and what it would do to your head, and how long it would take to learn the martial arts.

Furthermore, as Bruce Wayne has to keep appearances up, it means not only fighting circadian rhythm issues, but also frequent sleep deprivation—the hazards of which are even clearer and occur in short order. This raises the question of how realistic it is to regularly fight hardened knaves and miscreants without killing them. How would Batgirl or Catwoman need to fight to put those advantages to use?

Finally, for those of us who are no longer spring chicks, there are chapters about how Batman could expect to age, and how long he could keep performing at a level at which he could defeat his enemies. I enjoyed this book and found it both educational and interesting. It should be clear that Batman is just a teaching tool used to explore the limitations of the human body and its ability to endure a life of fighting. That said, references to the Batman comic books and movies makes for a readable text.

Perhaps what I like most about this book is that most of the books that address these subjects are textbooks that are sold on the textbook pricing model i.

This is one of the few books that takes on these topics at the readability and pricing model of a popular science book. I recommend it for those interested in the science of performance, martial arts, and injury. Sep 24, Karl Gruenewald rated it really liked it Shelves: Rather, what Zehr presents here is intended to answer a question that many of us may have wondered at one time or another: After all, a central element of the character is that he is — at the end of the day — only human albeit a fabulously wealthy one.

To the effect of answering that question, this book explores the limitations of the human body, which Zehr does while illustrating his arguments with frequent reference to Batman comic books and movies. Fans of the character will likely find the book worth their time purely for the sake of deepening their appreciation of that aspect of his lore. It bears repeating that Batman is employed here only as a teaching tool used to explore the limitations of the human body and its ability to endure a life of fighting, the purpose being to provide a more readable text.

His passion for the character clearly comes through however, and makes for a far more endearing read than if the book were in fact nothing more than a straightforward presentation of scientific facts. The author certainly knows his science, as well or better than he knows Batman.

The book is educational and interesting, and will especially fascinate those interested in the physiology of the body, martial arts, and injury. Apr 19, James rated it it was amazing. Here's a nonfiction book about some geeky and interesting questions: Given any training necessary, could an actual man become as strong, highly skilled, and agile as Batman is in the comic books?

If so, could that man fight crime the way Batman does?

If so, for how long? It's hard to imagine someone more qualified to answer such questions than E. Paul Zehr, who holds a Masters in Kinesiology and a Ph. His book-length treatment abou Here's a nonfiction book about some geeky and interesting questions: Did you know that Batman would be better off mastering a few martial arts styles rather than the styles that one comic book writer attributed to him?

Or that ninjutsu might be one of the two or three fighting styles he should master, owing to its emphasis on fighting from several different distances? Did you know that, with the better part of two decades' training, a person could possess Batman's skills and power?

Did you know that, when it comes to injuries, fighting crime as Batman does would probably be like doing mixed martial arts and being a professional linebacker at the same time? This book is a treasure for readers who like to think about the endless thought experiments that comic books provide.

Jul 29, Jc rated it liked it. Some readers might be surprised by this book. On the surface it appears like it would talk about what training and experience would allow one to approach being The Batman, or at least what Bruce Wayne may have gone through. However, it is really a clever way of teaching basic human physiology.

Yes, the idea is clever, and I am all for new ways to get people interested in the science of human biology. However, the author doesn't quite achieve what he sets out to do. The information is good, but I Some readers might be surprised by this book. Also, the author is clumsy with the Batman references -- often throwing them in just to remind the reader what the title of the book is without really using the Batman analogy in an effective way that adds to the lessons.

I think the fault is not the author, but the editors. With a little cleaning up and reshuffling this would make a great pre-college introductory text for a subject that more people should know about [referring to human biology, that is -- though maybe more people should know the Batman as well: The author did have some really great insight into the Eastern Martial Arts and how they affect the physiology of practioners.

This accounted for some of the most interesting passages. Jun 15, Jason rated it it was ok.

Becoming Batman : the possibility of a superhero

I wanted to enjoy reading this book much more than I did. All of the ingredients were present: Problem is, Zehr writes in circles, ne I wanted to enjoy reading this book much more than I did. Problem is, Zehr writes in circles, never really seeming to know when he's made his point. There are boatloads of information in this book about how the body works on a molecular level, but how much of it directly relates to whether or not Batman is plausible is left an open question.

I finished the book with the feeling that he could have said just as much - and said it better - with half as many words. The body can only get beat up all night, every night, for so long, no matter how well trained your are. Mar 03, Ben rated it it was ok Shelves: A look into what it might take to become Batman, since he's both one of the most well known superheroes and one of the non super-powered superheroes.

The book goes through all the science of how the body works, how muscles and reflexes develop as well as some of the training that might go into becoming Batman. While the science in the book is good, there were quite a few areas where I felt the book was lacking. Some sections felt underdeveloped--while there was a lot of good background provided, A look into what it might take to become Batman, since he's both one of the most well known superheroes and one of the non super-powered superheroes.

Some sections felt underdeveloped--while there was a lot of good background provided, the actual ideas sometimes got the short shrift. During the training and fighting sections, the author almost exclusively focuses on Eastern methodology and martial arts. While I realize that a lot of the Batman mythos focuses on his martial arts training, I thought it was a huge negative to not look at the training methods of modern special forces, because that seems like the closest actual analog to a superhero.

Finally the author overused exclamation points. It made the writing feel jokey, as if the author constantly felt like he had to convince the reader that, yes, this is fun and interesting stuff. Mar 15, Barry Lee rated it it was ok. I received this book as a gift and while I thought the topic was ridiculous, I read it anyway. As a martial artist and neuroscientist among other things, the author is an expert in multiple fields addressed in the book.

To my delight and surprise, there was a huge amount of hard data and factual information. The book was just so close to being good but it was all bogged down by the incoherent batman theme and repetitive writing. Still better than expected though. Jan 21, Thomas rated it really liked it. The author is a PhD in Neuroscience, an accomplished martial artist, and a comic book nerd, and does a great job of presenting, what usually is presented in a dull academic manner, the physiological needs to become and maintain the Batman.

Good science, good references, and some good humor make this a quick,fun read. Worth the time, check it out. Jul 10, Szymon Kulec rated it it was amazing. If you ever considered becoming Batman, it's probably the most important book that you should read.

It covers a lot of things: If you've never read about these things, this might be a good primer provided a well-written form. It's almost 7AM. It's time to go back to becoming Batman. Dec 05, Collin rated it liked it. This book details what training Batman would need and what would happen to his body as Batman. A lot of physiology and biomechanics. Not as good as I had hoped, disappointing overall. I don't like the authors style, often tries to be funny unsuccessfully. He is a professor of neuroscience and kinesiology as well as a martial artist and presumably a comic book fan.

Also we meet Bob, a fictional twin brother for Bruce to illustrate what a more average person would be undergoing daily compared to the intense training Bruce undergoes. Part two looks at training the human body to do what Batman does.

Part four is about the stresses of this sort of thing on the bones and muscles and what happens when we force ourselves to be nocturnal. Part five sums up whatever is left, probably where we see the most Bat-fallacies as this unit looks as what happens to the body when injured, especially in the lasting effects of multiple concussions and broken bones. Along with that are a comparison of male vs female trained warriors i.

Batgirl and Catwoman and the effects of aging how long could Batman remain Batman before he gets too old for the part. It balances the science with lay terms that should be easy for people to read but not being a lay person I could be overestimating that.

If you like science and comic books, give it a try. View all 3 comments. Aug 03, Dena Burnett rated it it was amazing. This book was pretty amazing. It combines two of the things I love most: Superheroes and Biomechanics.

My Graduate Supervisor recommended I read it - the title came up in a conversation over beers and a Batman vs. Iron Man conversation.

He hasn't led me astray with his recommendations and this book is no different. I couldn't put it down. As an "expert" I use the term loosely because although I'm intensively studying biomechanics, I'm still a student and have a lot to learn I really enjoyed th This book was pretty amazing.

Becoming Batman : the possibility of a superhero (eBook, ) [mtn-i.info]

As an "expert" I use the term loosely because although I'm intensively studying biomechanics, I'm still a student and have a lot to learn I really enjoyed this book.

Zehr also an expert was engaging enough that he didn't oversimplify and lose me in his analysis; I don't think he would come across as patronizing to the non-expert either. Excellent balance. For me, the main draw for this book was because I'm a HUGE Batman fan, simply because he's the only Superhero that is a "normal guy", just wanting to make Gotham City a better place.

I truly enjoyed this book. P , who wants to truly believe that there could just be a Batman.

I can't wait to read Zehr's 2nd book - Inventing Ironman Jul 23, Mark rated it liked it. The question this book seeks to answer is: If so, what sort of training would it take? Oh he is also super into martial arts. That Dr. Zehr manages to add any style to his efforts and let's be fair, scientists aren't known for their 'suave' , is a credit to the man and a credit to his obvious enthusiasm for his work and interests.

Zatsiorsky Centre Daily Times Not only is it enjoyable as a popular science book for those with even the smallest Batman obsession, it could be an entertaining way to introduce human movement science to potential students. Pain Journal of Sports Sciences Becoming Batman takes the escapism of the Caped Crusader and puts it in real-world, grounded, scientific terms that is extremely entertaining and interesting.

If you're not careful, you might learn something. Paul Zehr. It's a guy who is a doctor, and looking into the actual possibility of Batman and what it would take to be that person in real life: What it would do to your muscles and what it would do to your head, and how long it would take to learn the martial arts.

And it's really quite fascinating, this idea of the real facts behind it. Becoming Batman is arranged into sixteen chapters divided among five parts. It begins logically with the question of whether Bruce Wayne needs to begin at any particular point to achieve success in transforming himself into Batman?

In other words, how much does genetics come into play. The question of how much of Batman is innate and how much is painstaking built by exercise and training is critical to determining how many of those fanboys really could be Batman. There a series of chapters explaining the mechanism by which stressors result in a stronger, faster, more powerful, and more resilient Batman.

The only way one gets stronger muscles is by overloading them, which triggers a process of rebuilding them bigger and better than before.

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Incidentally, the same is true of the mind. A more agile mind is achieved only by working it, and zoning out in front of the television results in a dumbening. What kind of martial arts or arts would Batman practice? There is an often quoted statement in the comics to the effect that Batman had mastered martial arts.

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