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Browse recipes from the Momofuku Milk Bar cookbook, by Crist. MOMOFUKU ✓id chang and peter meehan m o of u ku david chang and peter meehan PHOTOGRAPHS BY GABRIELE STABILE CLARKSON. PDF | On Jan 10, , Farahiyatun Nufus and others published PDF Download Momofuku Milk Bar by Christina Tosi.

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Momofuku Milk Bar Pdf

This books (Momofuku Milk Bar [PDF]) Made by Christina Tosi About Books Title : Momofuku Milk Bar Binding: Hardcover Author: ChristinaTosi. Recipes From Momofuku Milk Bar by Christina Tosi - Free download as PDF File .pdf) or read online for free. This excerpt includes introduction and the recipe. The highly anticipated complement to the New York Times bestselling Momofuku cookbook, Momofuku Milk Bar reveals the recipes for the innovative, addictive.

Everyones sizing each other up and no one wants to take the time to learn your name until youve been to the battle of dinner service enough nights in a row to show that you arent going anywhere. The best way to get through it is to just throw your hand out there and share. My name is Christina Tosi. I am twenty-nine. We opened Momofuku Milk Bar six days after my twenty-seventh birthday. I never thought Id be where I am today. I was born in Ohio and raised in Virginia. Both of my grandmothers are avid bakers, nurturing souls, and ferocious card sharks. The matriarchs of my family bake for every occasion, large or smallbirthday, bake sale, and, more often than not, just because. We are a kinship of sweet teeth on both sides of the family, some more refined and some more restrained than others. My mother cannot give up ice cream for the life of her, because she just cant bear the thought of having to go to bed on an empty stomach. My father was known to substitute a chocolate ice cream cone for any meal of the day.

I laughed too, said, OK, and went back to whatever office work I was doing. But then Dave looked at me and said, Seriously, go make a dessert for service tonight.

He stared back, now stern and slightly cold. Make this, or make those cookies. I dont care what the fuck you make. Just make something. And make sure its fucking delicious. Thats how it started. There were a lot of horrible mistakes that never made it to the menu. Some days I made five things that sucked. Then one day something would taste really good. And climbing up the hill became less painful than the downward spiral of failure. I knew I wanted to draw on my influences, from both professional kitchens and home cooking adventures, and find a balance between the two.

Mostly it was a challenge. To figure out what my voice washow, stylistically, my food would translate. Luckily enough, Momofuku was the perfect home for desserts with no name, slightly confusing to some, but always thoughtful and delicious.

As a small restaurant group, with tight spaces and limited resources, we quickly learned that boundaries and limitations breed creativity. This always rang true for me, the one-person pastry department with no real prep table to call home. There was no ice cream machine and no service freezer, just the walk-in freezer downstairs, a healthy jog from the upstairs service kitchen.

There was no real heat source for baking anything to order la minuteor warming things for service. I prepped Ssm Bars desserts, and the garde-manger cook the person doing oysters and appetizers would plate and serve them.

Garde-manger had eight to ten other menu items coming off their station on a given night; dessert was not a priority.

I had to come up with recipes that were bulletproof. And the desserts had to appear thoughtfully composed, even without any of the elements that you typically get with dessert served at a fancy Manhattan restaurant. So I came up with ways to make desserts seem larger than the sum of their parts: shortcakes and pies somehow became elevated into something more. Everyone in the kitchen would get their spoons in something before it made it onto the menu. And I would make sure that the recipe was just right before we served it.

Once Ssm had two steady desserts, I moved on to Noodle Bar. Noodle Bar had already grown up and moved up the block from its original tiny spacewhich would later become Kointo a spacious by Momofuku standards new location. I pushed as hard as possible for a soft-serve machine. I had been hell-bent on having dessert at the original tiny Noodle Bar, but it was a turn-and-burn operation.

Diners would sometimes be in and out in an hour. So the idea of instituting a dessert program that would keep them in our tiny place for any longer than usual was not a popular one. Once Noodle Bar was running smoothly in its new location, Ko opened. We quickly flipped the space into a tastingmenu-only, online-reservations-only establishment. We had a lot of bad ideas for tasting-menu desserts, and deep down, I think Dave, Serp Peter Serpico, the chef de cuisine, who runs the restaurant , and I knew I was just going to have to hide out in the Ssm Bar basement and, come hell or high water, figure something out.

The only productive thing that came from the original group meetings was a collaborative love affair with the idea of a deep-fried apple pie and the fact that I was going to need a little help in the form of an FCI extern. Enter Marian Mar.

Dave and a few other Momo guys went to the FCI career fair one day, mostly in search of savory cooks for their kitchens, and Dave promised hed find me someone. Most people didnt even know the Momofukus served dessert, let alone thought of dropping off a pastry rsum. Except Marian. Mar showed up at Ssm Bar one night at 8 p. We wore winter hats and turtlenecks because the basement was freezing. Giggled and figured shit out. This continued once or twice a week for the next few months.

Little did either of us know Marian would become the anchor, lifesaver, soulmate, sister, and sous-chef who made and saved our little pastry department. She looked at me like I was a little insane when, days before Ko was set to open, I told her about this cereal milk idea I had instead.

I mean, I had to start looking at other options if I couldnt get the fried apple pie I promised figured out. We tasted my next few attempts at an apple pie with Serp, as well as the cereal milk panna cotta I was working on. The panna cotta had a pretty boring banana cream with it, and he wanted something slightly different.

He said, I may be crazy, but what about avocado? Both me and Mar perked up. Being a California girl, Mar loves avocados, and wed really wanted to use them in a dessert.

In fact, we had an avocado puree all ready, waiting for inspiration to strike. And there it was. This is the essence of how we come up with things. We make things that we are interested in. We make them taste good. Then we stand in front of our fridge, with the door open, just like you do at home when youre trying to figure out what to make for dinner or eat for a midnight snack.

We pick and pull out things weve been working on and see where we can merge ideas and flavors.

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We try to be intelligent about it. But most of the time, its a eureka moment that we didnt even know we were working toward. I finally came up with a deep-fried apple piea kind of take on the Hostess or McDonalds apple pies we all grew up onthrough some messed-up, backwards, forget-everything-youve-ever-learned-about-pie-dough stroke of stupidity and kept moving.

We opened our two-man pastry department at Ko by packing up five large pails of staple ingredients and a toolbox of equipment and moving them from Ssm to Ko in the back of a lovely little 93 Subaru station wagon, the company car. Once we had a little prep table to call our own and more regularish hours, we began menu developing, putting better systems into place in the restaurants for our dessert programs, and, of course, making family-meal dessert daily.

I developed a firm belief while working in restaurants in this city that family meal, the one prepared daily for your peers, is one of the most important meals youll cook. The respect and integrity you put into it speaks very highly of you as a cookand of how much you care about your fellow cooks. Often pastry is exempt from being required to contribute to family meal.

I would joke with anyone I worked next to that making family meal was my zen moment. I went back to my self-proclaimed roots; I baked without measuring sacrilege to most accomplished bakers and used whatever miseen-place was over- or underbaked or left over.

Family meal is meant to be delicious and nurturing. I made what I knew from years of baking for myselfsomething I affectionately called crack pie because you cant stop eating it, cookies galore, brownies, etc.

If there was a birthday within our three growing restaurants, I would make a layer cake with the same notion, using fillings we had on hand for our desserts. Little did we know that making family-meal desserts with our in-house mise-en-place for the other restaurants would be recipe testing for our next project. One day, tumbling down the stairs from the sidewalk into Kos basement, Dave said, Hey, if we could get you a bakery space, would you do it?

The Laundromat next to Ssm is closing, and we need to scoop up that space before someone else does. OK, I said. Id come to realize that having a bakery was what I wanted as an end goal. I just didnt think it would come so soon. No, but seriouslyif we could get that space for you to have as a bakery or something, would you really do it? I said yes. Ill do it, I shot back, puffing up my shoulders.

Its funny to think thats how most of our big conversations go. Theyre quick and to the point. Dave and I get each other, I think, on a level that most people dont, or maybe its just that no one has understood either of us before.

Its usually just a few sentences of dialogue; we figure out the hard stuff later. I knew I wanted to be in charge of my own kitchen, but I didnt think anyone would really hire me to be the head gal. I was still a little too young and impressionableand euphoric. I gave a quick head nod and let myself out of the office.

I had no idea what I was going to do, but knew what I needed to do. And thats how our strawberry shortcake simple, fast, and seasonal, the best thing I could come up with on short noticewas born. I think people who ate at Ssm that night, people who were used to there being nothing for dessert but frozen mochi right out of the box, were excited that there was a new option.

We sold some shortcakes. So the next day I made them again.

Dave quickly made an offer for me to be the etc. I love me a good challenge, getting in on the ground floor and growing alongside everything and everyone else, moving and shaking, fighting an uphill battleI love to organize, develop, figure it all out as a part of a team of believers.

Momofuku Noodle Bar was a success at that point; Ssm Bar was a burrito bar, not the restaurant it is today. There was never a mention of kitchen work. It was more office stuff, or tit shit, as Dave and I called it. I even worked the cash register! Looking back, I think he secretly had a plan all alonghe just knew I needed some time to grow into it. I went to work, gave it my all, and came home to my oven and jars of sugar.

I baked every night, and the next day I brought baked goods to the officea glorified closet where Dave and I and two other people worked full time. Dave would shovel the sweets into his mouth and joke about how I should start making desserts for the restaurants. We would laugh at how it would even happen. Who would plate desserts if we made them? And, more important, with a restaurant menu that was such a crazy hodgepodge of culinary approaches, what would we even serve? The idea of dessert seemed so far-fetched.

One day I brought in a toasted-miso crack pie, and Dave started in again. He started laughing and told me to go make a dessert for service that night. I laughed too, said, OK, and went back to whatever office work I was doing.

But then Dave looked at me and said, Seriously, go make a dessert for service tonight. He stared back, now stern and slightly cold. Make this, or make those cookies. I dont care what the fuck you make. Just make something. And make sure its fucking delicious. Thats how it started. There were a lot of horrible mistakes that never made it to the menu.

Some days I made five things that sucked. Then one day something would taste really good. And climbing up the hill became less painful than the downward spiral of failure. I knew I wanted to draw on my influences, from both professional kitchens and home cooking adventures, and find a balance between the two. Mostly it was a challenge. To figure out what my voice washow, stylistically, my food would translate. Luckily enough, Momofuku was the perfect home for desserts with no name, slightly confusing to some, but always thoughtful and delicious.

As a small restaurant group, with tight spaces and limited resources, we quickly learned that boundaries and limitations breed creativity. This always rang true for me, the one-person pastry department with no real prep table to call home. There was no ice cream machine and no service freezer, just the walk-in freezer downstairs, a healthy jog from the upstairs service kitchen. There was no real heat source for baking anything to order la minuteor warming things for service.

I prepped Ssm Bars desserts, and the garde-manger cook the person doing oysters and appetizers would plate and serve them. Garde-manger had eight to ten other menu items coming off their station on a given night; dessert was not a priority.

I had to come up with recipes that were bulletproof. And the desserts had to appear thoughtfully composed, even without any of the elements that you typically get with dessert served at a fancy Manhattan restaurant.

[PDF] Momofuku Milk Bar Full pages

So I came up with ways to make desserts seem larger than the sum of their parts: Everyone in the kitchen would get their spoons in something before it made it onto the menu. And I would make sure that the recipe was just right before we served it. Once Ssm had two steady desserts, I moved on to Noodle Bar. Noodle Bar had already grown up and moved up the block from its original tiny spacewhich would later become Kointo a spacious by Momofuku standards new location.

I pushed as hard as possible for a soft-serve machine. I had been hell-bent on having dessert at the original tiny Noodle Bar, but it was a turn-and-burn operation.

Diners would sometimes be in and out in an hour. So the idea of instituting a dessert program that would keep them in our tiny place for any longer than usual was not a popular one. Once Noodle Bar was running smoothly in its new location, Ko opened. We quickly flipped the space into a tastingmenu-only, online-reservations-only establishment. We had a lot of bad ideas for tasting-menu desserts, and deep down, I think Dave, Serp Peter Serpico, the chef de cuisine, who runs the restaurant , and I knew I was just going to have to hide out in the Ssm Bar basement and, come hell or high water, figure something out.

The only productive thing that came from the original group meetings was a collaborative love affair with the idea of a deep-fried apple pie and the fact that I was going to need a little help in the form of an FCI extern. Enter Marian Mar. Dave and a few other Momo guys went to the FCI career fair one day, mostly in search of savory cooks for their kitchens, and Dave promised hed find me someone.

Most people didnt even know the Momofukus served dessert, let alone thought of dropping off a pastry rsum. Except Marian. Mar showed up at Ssm Bar one night at 8 p. We wore winter hats and turtlenecks because the basement was freezing.

Giggled and figured shit out. This continued once or twice a week for the next few months. Little did either of us know Marian would become the anchor, lifesaver, soulmate, sister, and sous-chef who made and saved our little pastry department. Mar stood next to me watching me pull out my hair trying to make a deep-fried apple pie.

She looked at me like I was a little insane when, days before Ko was set to open, I told her about this cereal milk idea I had instead. I mean, I had to start looking at other options if I couldnt get the fried apple pie I promised figured out.

We tasted my next few attempts at an apple pie with Serp, as well as the cereal milk panna cotta I was working on. The panna cotta had a pretty boring banana cream with it, and he wanted something slightly different. He said, I may be crazy, but what about avocado? Both me and Mar perked up. Being a California girl, Mar loves avocados, and wed really wanted to use them in a dessert.

In fact, we had an avocado puree all ready, waiting for inspiration to strike. And there it was.

This is the essence of how we come up with things. We make things that we are interested in. We make them taste good. Then we stand in front of our fridge, with the door open, just like you do at home when youre trying to figure out what to make for dinner or eat for a midnight snack.

We pick and pull out things weve been working on and see where we can merge ideas and flavors. We try to be intelligent about it. But most of the time, its a eureka moment that we didnt even know we were working toward. I finally came up with a deep-fried apple piea kind of take on the Hostess or McDonalds apple pies we all grew up onthrough some messed-up, backwards, forget-everything-youve-ever-learned-about-pie-dough stroke of stupidity and kept moving.

We opened our two-man pastry department at Ko by packing up five large pails of staple ingredients and a toolbox of equipment and moving them from Ssm to Ko in the back of a lovely little 93 Subaru station wagon, the company car.

Once we had a little prep table to call our own and more regularish hours, we began menu developing, putting better systems into place in the restaurants for our dessert programs, and, of course, making family-meal dessert daily.

Momofuku Milk Bar

I developed a firm belief while working in restaurants in this city that family meal, the one prepared daily for your peers, is one of the most important meals youll cook.

The respect and integrity you put into it speaks very highly of you as a cookand of how much you care about your fellow cooks. Often pastry is exempt from being required to contribute to family meal. I would joke with anyone I worked next to that making family meal was my zen moment. I went back to my self-proclaimed roots; I baked without measuring sacrilege. Family meal is meant to be delicious and nurturing. I made what I knew from years of baking for myselfsomething I affectionately called crack pie because you cant stop eating it, cookies galore, brownies, etc.

If there was a birthday within our three growing restaurants, I would make a layer cake with the same notion, using fillings we had on hand for our desserts. Little did we know that making family-meal desserts with our in-house mise-en-place for the other restaurants would be recipe testing for our next project.

One day, tumbling down the stairs from the sidewalk into Kos basement, Dave said, Hey, if we could get you a bakery space, would you do it? The Laundromat next to Ssm is closing, and we need to scoop up that space before someone else does. OK, I said. Id come to realize that having a bakery was what I wanted as an end goal. I just didnt think it would come so soon. No, but seriouslyif we could get that space for you to have as a bakery or something, would you really do it?

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