Date published 

 

The Science Book: Everything You Need to Know About the World and How It Works [National Geographic, Marshall Brain] on mtn-i.info *FREE* shipping. Science of Everything: How Things Work in Our World [National Geographic, The Science Book: Everything You Need to Know About the World and How It. Everything Maths Grade 11 - Everything Maths and Science This book is based upon the original Free High School Science Text which was entirely written.

Author:FRANKLIN PIMENTEL
Language:English, Spanish, Indonesian
Country:Haiti
Genre:Technology
Pages:623
Published (Last):19.07.2016
ISBN:911-1-80949-922-7
Distribution:Free* [*Registration needed]
Uploaded by: LELA

47233 downloads 137275 Views 25.54MB ePub Size Report


Everything Science Book

Everything Science Grade 10 - Everything Maths and Science This book is based upon the original Free High School Science Text which was entirely written. With Siyavula Practice, you CAN master Maths and Physical Sciences. Plus, our books are open resources, so you can copy them, share them, or even modify . Click on each book cover to see the available files to download, in English and Afrikaans. Better than just free, these Physical Sciences Grade Read online .

Book Review SeanMcDowell. After all, he is not only brilliant Emeritus Professor of Math at Oxford , but also remarkably gracious in his interaction with critics. This is not easy to do when writing on such divisive issues as the intersection of faith and science! As Lennox notes, we live in an increasingly secular age that embraces scientism , the idea that science is the primary and sometimes only means of knowing reality. Given their radically different belief systems, and the disdain that often characterizes interaction between the two camps, many conclude that God and science do not mix. Enter John Lennox. He suggests that this claim is not only false, but that it is easy to establish. This is a bold claim to make, but one Lennox adequately defends. Four Key Challenges First, is it true that science and God do not mix?

And it was all done in about the time it takes to make a sandwich. So Texas now boasts the most expensive hole in the universe. For example, cobalt is necessary for the production of vitamin B12 and a minute amount of sodium is good for your nerves. On Earth's atmosphere, the author notes that the troposphere, that part of the lower atmosphere that contains the air we breathe, is between 6 and 10 miles thick. He concludes, "There really isn't much between you and oblivion. It's coming at 30, m.

This renders the book of little interest to a scientist, but has certain advantages for the layperson. In some cases, emphasis is not given to the most important issue. Bryson simply lacks the insight and judgement of a trained scientist. Chapter One on the Big Bang is particularly difficult for the author. There is too much discussion on inflation and on the many-universe theory. Inflation, which is the idea that the space underwent a tremendous stretching at a tiny fraction of a second after "the beginning", is consistent with astronomical observations, is theoretically attractive but has no confirming evidence yet.

The multi-universe theory, which proposes that our universe is only one of many and disconnected from the others, is complete speculation. On the other hand, Bryson neglects events that have been observationally established.

Big Bang Nucleosynthesis , in which the nuclei of the three lightest elements were made, is glossed over in one paragraph. Bryson simply refers to the cosmic microwave background radiation as something "left over from the Big Bang", a description lacking true insight.

As another example of misplaced emphasis, much of the chapter entitled "Welcome to the Solar System," is on Pluto and its discovery and on how school charts poorly convey the vast distances between planets. Although the Sun is not even treated, Bryson ends the discussion with "So that's your solar system.

In Chapter 27 entitled "Ice Time, he discusses as through it happened with certainty the " Snowball Earth. The book says, "Temperatures plunged by as much as 80 degrees Fahrenheit. The entire surface of the planet may have frozen solid, with ocean ice up to a half mile thick at high latitudes and tens of yards thick even in the tropics.

Then the chapter on hominid development does the opposite by presenting the situation as highly unknown and debatable. It is true that the fossil record for the transition from apes to Homo sapiens is quite fragmentary and that anthropologists are dividerd over certain important issues such as how to draw the lines between species to create the family tree, how Homo sapiens spread over the globe and what caused brain size to increase.

However, the overall pattern of homonid evolution is understood. As far as the second half of the book, I found nothing worthy of comment, except I admire his willingness to see metaphor as an integral part of science, and I say as it is with life. I thought the book to be a fair appraisal of the state of the science of prediction, and what can be expected from it in the future.

GRAdE 12 PHYSICAL SCIENCES - Everything Science Download ( Pages | Free )

I am not sure how other scientists working on prediction models would rebut his arguments, that the main problem with these models is model error for instance, not having enough parameters , not sensitive dependence on initial conditions ala chaos theory ; although, I do not think he believes that chaos theory does not play any role at all. Orrell is a good explainer and easily understood by someone conversant enough with science.

The book was enjoyable to read, and I did learn some new stuff, not just stuff I already new explained in a different way, that I often run into in reading popular science books. If you are looking for what is going to happen in the future, you maybe disappointed. However, if you would like to know or know more about models used in prediction science, especially those involved with the weather, health, or economics, the book should be of interest to you.

I will offer one word of caution. If you are looking for actual mathematics except for the appendixes and not just description, I feel you would be as disappointed as those that wish for predictions for what is going to occur in the future. Apr 29, David rated it it was ok. A lot of words to reach an underwhelming conclusion. Jan 15, Gumble's Yard rated it it was ok Shelves: The book considers three main areas: The introduction to the book is an interesting history of forecasting - starting with ancient history Delphi, Greek attempts to understand astronomy, astrology then Renaissance developments Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Descartes then through Darwin, Malthus and Freud and into quantum theory and chaos and more importantly complexity.

Den Autoren folgen

This is probably the strongest part of the book. A key premise of the book is that many models are not just chaotic; they are e The book considers three main areas: A key premise of the book is that many models are not just chaotic; they are extremely sensitive to parameters.

Further some systems are simply not predictable; even if a model can be built there is no way to predict outcomes other than by running the models. Another strong view is that biologists Dawkins is explicitly mentioned still have an over strong belief in determinism and in a mechanical world model of the type discarded by physicists a long time ago.

Timing Is Everything

The conclusions are similar - unlike say planetary motion, the systems are complex, model and parameterisation error dwarfs the butterfly effect, models can easily be used to fit past data but are unreliable going forwards and also cannot be predicted without running them often in not far off real time. The third section brings some of the thoughts together including discussing the psychology of the climate change debate. This is the weakest section including a rather over long Gaia section and incongruously making some future long term predictions.

A mixed "curate's egg" of a book - definitely with some interesting ideas and worth retaining but not one to recommend to others. View 1 comment. A knowledgable book that covers the study of prediction since the ancient times to now.

Discusses the error of current models and provides counterarguments for common arguments, etc. The title of this book is a little over-reaching, since it mostly just discusses the prediction of weather, the economy, and an individual's health over the course of his lifetime. That said, I thought this book was so interesting.

It starts with a historical overview of the tools the ancients used to predict events in their world.

For example, how the model of the earth as the center of the universe was so entrenched in their mind-set, and how that prevented them from moving forward even when o The title of this book is a little over-reaching, since it mostly just discusses the prediction of weather, the economy, and an individual's health over the course of his lifetime. For example, how the model of the earth as the center of the universe was so entrenched in their mind-set, and how that prevented them from moving forward even when observations were inconsistent with the model.

When Isaac Newton invented calculus and was actually able to predict the movement of the planets with real accuracy, it caused scientists in all disciplines to believe that all science should be tools of this kind of clean and precise prediction. But, physics is an anomaly in that way.

Systems like the weather, organisms and the economy can't be predicted from given starting conditions, because, as the system moves forward, new conditions emerge as the result of the system moving forward, and that can't be captured by mathematical equations. From this book I learned 1 a precipitation forecast is only accurate for 24 hours, and 2 invest in index funds and forget the rest of the stock market. The author was able to explain concepts in such a way that I could understand even though I am a product of the public school system and my math skills are shameful.

This book wasn't a quick, easy read. There were several parts where I had to read the same paragraph about 40 times before what he was saying came together, and I finally grasped where he was coming from. This book made me want to learn more about chaos and emergence theory.

This book is about why it's so hard to predict certain things. In particular, it focuses on models and methods for predicting weather, health and wealth.

National Geographic Science of Everything

The book begins with a historical overview of major scientific advances, from the Greeks to the 20th century, that improved our ability to predict things like the motions of the planets and shaped our expectations for our ability to control the future.

Then it looks at methods for making short-term predictions and long-term predictions of its This book is about why it's so hard to predict certain things. Then it looks at methods for making short-term predictions and long-term predictions of its three main topics. Weather covers tomorrow's weather as well as climate change. Health looks at individual genetic profiles and global pandemics.

Wealth looks at predicting stock and commodity prices over a few weeks or months and longer-term effects like recessions and bubbles. In all these cases, the author argues that the systems are so inherently complex that they cannot be modeled. That is, they cannot be reduced to equations that can be solved to predict future states. They are uncomputable.

The best we can do is create models that simulate these systems. But our models have so many parameters that even minor adjustments to a few of them can cause huge changes in the predictions the models make. All of which means that the future is inherently unpredicatble. Faster computers or better models won't help. The author concludes with some thoughts about the usefulness of models and how to prepare for an unpredictable future.

He believes that, even if we can't be sure about major events like climate change, it seems foolhardy not to prepare for them, just in case. The cost of preparing for catastrophe and being wrong is less than the cost of NOT preparing for catastrophe and being wrong.

Mar 03, Mason rated it really liked it Shelves: I was surprised to find out how fuzzy predictions are--from those about the climate to those about what the economy will do.

This doesn't mean that climate change isn't real, by the way. Basic physics says that all our greenhouse gases will warm the planet substantially. But when researchers try to predict whether this warming will be moderate or catastrophic, they have to use computer models.

And this book made me a lot more skeptical about their results. They're useful for showing what's possi I was surprised to find out how fuzzy predictions are--from those about the climate to those about what the economy will do. Many atheists have argued that religion is a dangerous delusion.

In reality, religious involvement correlates with individual wellbeing, satisfaction in life, hope and optimism, greater self-esteem, better response to personal loss, deeper social support, and lower rates of depression.

In fact, as Lennox notes, the positive side of religious belief is one of the best kept secrets in psychiatry and medicine. Fourth, is belief in God equivalent to believing in the tooth fairy? Lennox met this accusation while speaking publicly at a large university. To settle the issue, he asked members of the audience to raise their hands if they came to believe in the tooth fairy as an adult. No one did, but hundreds did when he asked who came to believe in God as an adult.

Some of the finest minds have come to believe in God, but none have with Santa Claus or the tooth fairy. Concluding Thoughts Quite obviously, Lennox addresses much more than these four questions. What I enjoyed most about the book is his abundant use of personal stories and practical illustrations to illustrate his arguments.